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For the Chamber de Commerce et d'Industrie de Paris or CCIP, see Paris Chamber of Commerce
For the Cisco CCIP certification, see Cisco Career Certifications

Constantly Computed Impact Point (CCIP) is a function with a weapon's sighting system. It provides a depiction of the calculated point of impact, that works out from the launch platform's movement, the target's movement, gravity, projectile launch velocity, projectile drag, and other factors that can be entered, where a projectile will land and displays the information on the Heads Up Display (HUD).

The crosshairs will move around dependent on where the computer predicts the selected rocket, bullet or bomb will hit. Normally a radar lock is necessary, but when strafing or bombing a ground target (A/G mode; A/A mode will simply put the hairs in the centre of the HUD), the crosshairs will move along the ground.

This system is normally used in aircraft or other large vehicles or large static weapons, but it may be possible that the system could be or has been condensed into something that can fit on the top of man portable firearms too.

This system is sometimes combined with an autorelease system so that an aircraft can lock a low drag bomb onto a target from a safe distance, and the bomb can then be released while the aircraft is in a high G climb (when the target would no longer be visible over the aircraft's nose) so that the aircraft does not need to overfly the target.

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