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Julius A. De Lagnel
Born (1827-07-24)July 24, 1827
Died June 3, 1912(1912-06-03) (aged 84)
Place of birth Newark, New Jersey
Place of death Washington, D.C.
Buried at Alexandria, Virginia
Allegiance Flag of the United States (1847-1848).svg United States of America
Flag of the Confederate States of America (1865).svg Confederate States of America
Service/branch U.S. Army
Confederate States Army
Years of service 1847–1861
1861–1865
Rank Union army 1st lt rank insignia First Lieutenant, USA
Confederate States of America Lieutenant Colonel Lieutenant Colonel, CSA
Confederate States of America General temporary Brigadier General, CSA
Unit 2nd United States Artillery
Inspector of Arsenals
Battles/wars American Civil War
Other work Pacific steamship service.

Julius Adolph De Lagnel (July 24, 1827 – June 3, 1912), was a Confederate States Army officer, who was appointed and confirmed as a brigadier general, during the American Civil War, but who declined the appointment. He was second in command to Brigadier General Josiah Gorgas[1] in the Confederate Ordnance Bureau and at times was an inspector of arsenals. Before the war, he served in the United States Army from March 8, 1847 until May 17, 1861. After the war, he was engaged in Pacific steamship service.

Early lifeEdit

Julius Adolph De Lagnel was born on July 24, 1827 in Newark, New Jersey.[2][3]

De Lagnel was commissioned directly into the U.S. Army in 1847 as a second lieutenant of artillery without attending the United States Military Academy or a military college.[3] He was promoted to first lieutenant on January 26, 1849.[2] He resigned on May 17, 1861 and moved to his "adopted" state of Virginia to join the Confederate States Army.[2][4]

American Civil WarEdit

After his resignation from the U.S. Army, Julius A. De Lagnel was appointed a captain of artillery in the regular army of the Confederate States.[2] In June 1861, he was assigned as chief of artillery to Brigadier General Robert S. Garnett, commander of the Army of the Northwest, who was sent to reorganize the Confederate force in the western counties of Virginia after their rout at the Battle of Philippi and to hold the area for the Confederacy.[2] De Lagnel defended the crest of Rich Mountain with a force of four companies and one gun[5] during the Battle of Rich Mountain, July 11, 1861.[2] The main Confederate force did not immediately know that De Lagnel was under attack by a superior force commanded by Brigadier General William S. Rosecrans.[2] De Lagnel's force eventually was overwhelmed.[2] After fighting with the sole artillery piece by himself for a period of time, De Lagnel was wounded and hid in a thicket in an effort to escape.[5] He initially did escape from the battlefield to a mountaineer's cabin and after two days of recuperation, he tried to return to Confederate lines disguised as a herder.[3] He was detected and captured near Laurel Hill, Virginia on July 13, 1861.[2] On December 18, 1861, De Lagnel was exchanged for Union Brigadier General James B. Ricketts.[2]

De Lagnel was appointed and confirmed as a brigadier general to rank from April 12, 1862, but on July 31, 1862, he declined the commission.[2][3] Historian Stewart Sifakis says the reason for this is unknown.[5] De Lagnel then briefly served as major of artillery in the 20th Battalion of Virginia Artillery[4] in the Army of Northern Virginia, in June and July 1862.[6]

In July 1862, De Lagnel was appointed lieutenant colonel of ordnance and served as second in command of the Confederate Ordnance Bureau under Brigadier General Josiah Gorgas.[6] He also commanded the Fayetteville, North Carolina arsenal, July 1862 – 1863.[2] In addition to his ordnance duties, De Lagnel also acted as inspector of arsenals.[6] He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina, May 1, 1865.[2]

AftermathEdit

After the Civil War, De Lagnel was engaged in the Pacific steamship service for many years.[2][3] He died on June 3, 1912 at Washington, D.C..[2][3] Julius Adolph De Lagnel was buried in St. Paul's Churchyard, Alexandria, Virginia.[2]

See alsoEdit

List of American Civil War generals (Confederate)

NotesEdit

  1. Gorgas, who had married Amelia Gayle, daughter of former Alabama Governor John Gayle, also was born in the north, in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 Eicher, John H., and David J. Eicher. Civil War High Commands. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001. ISBN 0-8047-3641-3. p. 206
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Warner, Ezra J. Generals in Gray: Lives of the Confederate Commanders. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1959. ISBN 0-8071-0823-5. p. 71
  4. 4.0 4.1 Boatner, Mark Mayo, III. The Civil War Dictionary. New York: McKay, 1988. ISBN 0-8129-1726-X. First published New York, McKay, 1959. p. 232
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Sifakis, Stewart. Who Was Who in the Civil War. New York: Facts On File, 1988. ISBN 0-8160-1055-2. p. 177
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Wert, Jeffry D. "De Lagnel, Julius Adolph" in Historical Times Illustrated History of the Civil War, edited by Patricia L. Faust. New York: Harper & Row, 1986. ISBN 978-0-06-273116-6. p. 214

ReferencesEdit

  • Boatner, Mark Mayo, III. The Civil War Dictionary. New York: McKay, 1988. ISBN 0-8129-1726-X. First published New York, McKay, 1959.
  • Eicher, John H., and David J. Eicher. Civil War High Commands. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001. ISBN 0-8047-3641-3.
  • Sifakis, Stewart. Who Was Who in the Civil War. New York: Facts On File, 1988. ISBN 0-8160-1055-2.
  • Warner, Ezra J. Generals in Gray: Lives of the Confederate Commanders. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1959. ISBN 0-8071-0823-5.
  • Wert, Jeffry D. "De Lagnel, Julius Adolph" in Historical Times Illustrated History of the Civil War, edited by Patricia L. Faust. New York: Harper & Row, 1986. ISBN 978-0-06-273116-6. p.  214.

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