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PT-76
Pt-76 afv
PT-76 on display near the Museum of the Great Patriotic War, Kiev
Type Amphibious Light Tank
Place of origin  Soviet Union
Service history
In service 16 August 1952–present
Production history
Designer N. Shashmurin and Zh.Y. Kotin
Designed 1949–51
Manufacturer VTZ, Kirov Factory
Produced 1953–69
Number built Around 12,000[1]
Specifications (PT-76 model 1)
Weight 14.6 tonnes
Length 6.91 m (hull)
Width 3.15 m
Height 2.325 m
Crew 3 (driver, commander, loader)

Armour 20 mm
Primary
armament
76,2 mm D-56T rifled tank gun (40 rds.)
Secondary
armament
7.62 mm SGMT coax machine gun (1,000 rds.)
Engine 6-cyl. diesel
240 hp (179 kW)
Power/weight 16.4 hp/tonne
Suspension torsion-bar
Ground clearance 370 mm
Fuel capacity 250 l
Operational
range
370–400 km, 480–510 km with external fuel
Speed 44 km/h (27 mph), 10.2 km/h (6.3 mph) swimming



The PT-76 is a Soviet light amphibious tank which was introduced in the early 1950s and soon became the standard reconnaissance tank of the Soviet Army and the other Warsaw Pact armed forces. It was widely exported to other friendly states, like India, Iraq, North Korea and North Vietnam. Overall, some 25 countries used the PT-76.

The tank's full name is Floating Tank–76 (Russian language: Плавающий Танк, Plavayushchiy Tank, or ПТ-76). 76 stands for the caliber of the main armament: the 76.2 mm D-56T series rifled tank gun.

The PT-76 is used in the reconnaissance and fire-support roles. Its chassis served as the basis for a number of other vehicle designs, many of them amphibious, including the BTR-50 armored personnel carrier, the ZSU-23-4 self-propelled antiaircraft gun, the ASU-85 airborne self-propelled gun and the 2K12 Kub anti-aircraft missile launch vehicle.

DevelopmentEdit

After World War II, the concept of light tanks was resurrected in the USSR. They were to be used in reconnaissance units and therefore an amphibious ability was essential. The requirements stated that the vehicle should be able to cross water obstacles with little preparation. Many prototypes of such light tanks were built in the late 1940s. The most successful was designed by the engineer N. Szaszmurin working at the Kirov plant in Leningrad in 1948. The vehicle was successful because it had a simple design, good navigational traits and a good cross country capability. At the time, its water-jet design was innovative.[2]

Further development of the design was carried out between 1949–1951 under the leadership of Zh. Y. Kotin, and the tank was officially adopted on August 16, 1952 with the designation PT-76. Production started in 1953 at the Volgograd Tractor Factory and the Kirov plant in Leningrad. The Model 1 was produced in limited numbers and was quickly replaced in production by the Model 2. In 1958 an improved variant, the PT-76B, was adopted and remained in production until 1968.[citation needed]

DesignEdit

PT-76-latrun-3

An Ex-Egyptian or ex-Syrian PT-76 in Yad la-Shiryon Museum, Israel. The circular bulge of an air intake on the rear of the turret is for the fitting of a snorkel. The water-jet outlets at the rear of the vehicle, both of which are closed, can be clearly seen.

The PT-76 has a typical tank layout: the steering compartment at the front, the combat compartment in the center and the engine compartment at the back. The tank has a three-man crew, with the commander also acting as the radio operator and gunner. This reduces his effectiveness as an observer. The commander and loader stations are located inside the turret, the commander sits on the left-hand side of the main gun and the loader sits on the right. They have a large oval shaped double hatch which opens forwards on top of the turret. The driver sits in the center of the front of the hull and has a one piece hatch that opens to the right, with three vision blocks and periscopes located beneath the main gun at the top of the sloping glacis plate. Under the driver's seat there is an emergency hatch which can be used by all crew members. At night the center periscope is swapped for a TVN-28 night vision device which gives the driver clear vision up to 60 meters.[3][4][5]

ArmamentEdit

PT-76-batey-haosef-2

A PT-76 in Batey ha-Osef museum, Tel Aviv, Israel. In this view one water-jet outlet is open and the other is closed.

Its main armament consists of a 76.2 mm D-56T series rifled tank gun which has an effective range of approximately 1,500 meters and a rate of fire of six to eight rounds per minute. This gun is 42 calibers long. The PT-76 carries 40 rounds for its gun. A typical ammunition load consists of 24 x OF-350 Frag-HE, 4 x subcaliber AP-T, 4 x AP-T and 8 x BK-350M HEAT rounds. The gun is mounted in an oval dish-type circular truncated cone turret with flat sloping sides which is mounted over the second, third, and fourth pair of road wheels. All PT-76s have a fume extractor for the main gun at the rear of the turret.[1][3][4][5][6]

The 7.62 mm SGMT coaxial medium machine gun comes with 1,000 rounds. This weapon has a maximum effective range of 1,000 meters in daylight while the vehicle is stationary, 400 to 500 meters in daylight while the vehicle is on the move and 600 meters at night. Maximum range is 1,500 meters. It can be fired in 2 to 10 round bursts and has a practical rate of fire of 250 rounds per minute and a cyclic rate of fire of 650 rounds per minute.

The main gun is considered light for a modern tank which can fire BM-354P HVAP, undercaliber AP-T, AP-T, BR-350 API-T and OF-350 Frag-HE rounds (as can the 76.2 mm M1942 (ZiS-3) divisional gun) and is capable of penetrating the armour of APCs and other lightly armored vehicles.

The commander/gunner has a cupola on the left side of the double hatch. The cupola has the TPKU-2B observation device and two TNP day periscopes and can be rotated 360 degrees by hand. The commander also has a 4X optical sight mounted to the left of the main armament and a TShK-66 sight/rangefinder. The loader has the MK-4 observation device mounted on the turret's roof in front of the hatch.

Ammunition CharacteristicsEdit

PT-76-latrun-1

An Ex-Egyptian or ex-Syrian PT-76 in Yad la-Shiryon Museum, Israel. Note the elevated trim vane at the front of the vehicle.

The BM-354P High Velocity Armor Piercing (HVAP) round has a maximum effective range of 650 meters by day and 600 meters at night. Its maximum aimed range is 1,060 meters. It can penetrate 127 mm of armour at muzzle and 50 mm at 1,000 meters. The armour piercing round can pierce 60 mm of armor inclined at 60 degrees from a range of 2,000 meters. The BK-350M High Explosive Anti Tank or HEAT round has a maximum effective range of 650 meters by day and 600 meters at night. Its maximum range is 1,000 meters. It can penetrate 280 mm of armour at 1,000 meters. The OF-350 Frag-HE round has a maximum effective range of 600 meters at night and a maximum range of 4,000 meters. The gun can be fired while the vehicle is afloat. The gun can also be depressed and elevated between -4 and +30 degrees so like most Soviet tanks, the PT-76 has a limited ability to depress its main gun, and therefore cannot fire effectively from higher ground. One of the greatest disadvantages of the gun used on the PT-76 Model 1 was that it had no stabilization system and therefore couldn't be effectively fired while the vehicle was on the move. The PT-76 Model 2 has a 1-axis stabilization system and the PT-76B has a 2-axis system.

CountermeasuresEdit

PT 76 7 DOW TBiU 12

A Polish PT-76 amphibious light tank coming out of the water during an amphibious exercise. Note the two flat additional external fuel tanks at the rear corners of the hull.

The armor of the PT-76 consists of homogeneous, cold rolled, welded steel. Its turret has 20 mm at 35° at the front, 16 mm at 35° at the sides, 11 mm at 33° at the rear and 8 mm at 0° on top of the turret. The hull is made up of: 10 mm at 80° at the upper front, 13 mm at 80° at the lower front, 14 mm at 0° at the sides, 7 mm at 0° in the rear and 5 mm at 0° underneath. This gives it protection against 7.62 mm small arms fire and small artillery shell fragments. It does not protect it against 12.7 mm or .50-caliber heavy machine gun fire or larger shell fragments.[1][2][3][5][7]

MobilityEdit

Tactical mobilityEdit

The torsion bar suspension consists of six evenly spaced large rubber-tired road wheels with the drive sprocket at the rear and the idler at the front. The road wheels are hollow to minimize weight. These hollow road wheels increase the tank's buoyancy by 30%. There are no track-return rollers. The first and last road wheels have a hydraulic shock absorber and the steel tracks have 96 links each when new, each link has a single pin. There is a small, thin, horizontal skirt over each track. Its V-6 6-cylinder 4-stroke in line water-cooled diesel engine develops 240 hp (179 kW) at 1,800 rpm which gives it a road speed of 44 km/h and a range of 370 km to 400 km. The vehicle can cross 1.1 m high vertical obstacles and 2.8 m wide trenches and climb 52° gradients. The engine has a cooling system and an initial heater (intended for use when the air temperature is -20°C or colder). The PT-76 has a 5 speed manual shaft-type transmission system similar to the one in the T-34/85. The gearbox has four forward gears and one reverse. The vehicle has a side clutch that enables it to make turns and a bandbrake. The tank has four mounts for additional external fuel tanks at the rear of the hull. The two on the corners are for flat type external tanks and the two in the center are for a drum type. These additional tanks increase the range from 370 km - 400 km to 480 km - 510 km. The PT-76 is a reliable, simple to operate and highly mobile reconnaissance vehicle and is ideally designed for amphibious operations, but it has many limitations as a fighting vehicle.[1][3][4][5][6][8][9]

PT 76 7 DOW TBiU 12 3

Swimming Polish PT-76s.

Strategic mobilityEdit

Pt76

A PT-76 in the Museum of the Great Patriotic War, Kiev, with another view of the radio antenna on the left-hand side of the turret.

The PT-76 is amphibious, it has a flat, boat-shaped hull which is hermetical and ensures minimal resistance when the tank is afloat. It can swim after switching on the two electric bilge pumps, erecting the trim vane which improves the vehicle's stability and displacement in the water and prevents water from flooding into the bow of the tank. Switching the driver's periscope for a swimming periscope enables the driver to see over the trim vane. When not in use the trim vane is stowed in the front of the bow over the barrel of the main gun and serves as additional armor. Bilge pumps keep the tank afloat even if it leaks or is damaged. There is a manual bilge pump for emergency use. The tank is propelled through the water by two hydrojets, one on each side of the hull, with the inlets undermeath the hull and the outlets at the rear. There are also additional assistant water-jet inlets on both sides of the hull over the last road wheels. The rear outlets have lids that can be fully or partially closed, redirecting the water stream to the forward-directed outlets at the sides of the hull, thus enabling the vehicle to turn or go in reverse. To go turn to the left for example, the left water-jet is covered, to turn to the right, the right water-jet is covered. To make a 180° turn, one water-jet sucks in water while the other pushes it out. This system was designed by N. Konowalow. It is the same system as the one used in the BTR-50 APC which was based on the PT-76. The tank can swim at up to 10,2 km/h and has a range of 100 km. It can cross most water obstacles and can also swim in the sea. However, its amphibious design makes it disproportionally large for a vehicle of its weight and allows less armor protection than other light tanks.[1][3][4][8]

EquipmentEdit

The PT-76 is equipped with a tank communication device, a gyro compass, a 10-RT-26E radio and has an antenna for it which extends itself when needed. It also has two headlights in front of the hull and a searchlight on the right-hand side of the top of the turret. It lagged behind other Soviet armoured fighting vehicles because only the driver had a night vision device and also because it has no fire or NBC (nuclear, biological, chemical) protection systems, which significantly reduced its effectiveness. The lack of NBC protection ended with the PT-76B which has the PAZ ("protivo-atomnaya zashchita") NBC protection system. Because only the driver has night vision equipment, the crew has a vision range of 4,000 m (13,000 ft) by day and 600 m (2,000 ft) at night.[1][3][4][5]

Service historyEdit

Soviet naval infantrymen and PT-76 DN-ST-90-00772

A Soviet naval infantryman stands with an arm on his PT-76 amphibious light tank in August 1989. Note the large (opened) oval shaped double hatch, the searchlight on the right hand side of the top of the turret and a radio antenna on the left hand-side of the turret.

About 12,000 PT-76s were built during the vehicle's lifetime, of which some 2,000 were exported. Over 25 countries employed the vehicle, including Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, China, Congo, Cuba, Egypt, Finland, Guinea, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Laos, Madagascar, Mozambique, North Korea, Pakistan, Poland, Vietnam, and Yugoslavia.[1]

The PT-76 was used as the standard reconnaissance tank of the Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact armies. It was also intended for water obstacle fording operations and naval infantry landings. It served in the reconnaissance subunits of tank divisions and mechanized divisions of the Red Army and Soviet marines divisions. Although it has been replaced in front line service by the BMP-1 and BRM-1, it may still be found in the reconnaissance companies and battalions of some motorized rifle and tank regiments and divisions, as well as in naval infantry units. Aside from its reconnaissance role, it is also used for crossing water obstacles in the first wave of an attack and for artillery support during the establishment of a beachhead.[3] The main disadvantage of the BMP-1 and the BRM-1 when compared to the PT-76 is the absence of a powerful main armament. However, the BRM-1 is fitted with more modern reconnaissance equipment. Also, both vehicles have stronger front armor and superior mobility features and the BMP-1 can carry up to 8 fully equipped soldiers inside. The PT-76 is still on active service in a number of countries mainly in the third world. The Russian Army is reported to have used PT-76 units in the ongoing war in Chechnya.[1][4]

The PT-76 is used/stationed by/in following Russian units/bases: 61st tank repair plant (1), 61st Kirkinesskaya marine brigade (26) from Sputnik which is part of the Murmansk military district, 175th marine brigade (26) from Tumannyy which is part of the Murmansk military district and 336th Belostokskaya marine brigade (26) from Baltyysk which is part of the Kaliningrad military district.[10]

In Ludowe Wojsko Polskie (LWP), PT-76s and PT-76Bs were used by the reconnaissance subunits of tank divisions and mechanized divisions and Coastal Defense units including the 7th Lusatian Landing Division (officially known as 7th Coast Defense Division).[4] Poland also operated FROG-5 "Luna" tactical missile launch vehicles.[11]

PT-76s were in service with the Indian Army and they were in reserve status before they were withdrawn from service in 2009 after which they were used for target practice by the army and as static memorials at various military facilities.[12]

Combat ServiceEdit

The Vietnam WarEdit

PT 76 6 DOW TBiU 12

A Polish PT-76 on the move during an exercise. It was a part of the 7th Lusatian Landing Division. Notice the opened large oval shaped double hatch.

PT-76s along with T-54s, T-55s, Type 59s and Type 63s formed the bulk of the NVA armored forces.

The first successful action of NVA armor was against the Lang Vei Special Forces camp on 6/7 February 1968.[13] Thirteen PT-76s, of the NVA 202nd Armored Regiment spearheaded an assault against approximately 24 Green Berets and 500 irregulars. The defenders fought back with M72 LAWs (Light Anti-Tank Weapons/66 mm), and requested support from nearby Khe Sanh, who were unable to help, as they too, were under siege.[13] The few survivors broke out, and were airlifted to safety.

The first tank to tank engagement occurred in mid 1968 when a US reconnaissance airplane observed a PT-76 being washed by its crew in the Ben Hai River in the DMZ (17th Parallel). The Forward Air Control pilot radioed the tank's position to a nearby M48 Patton tank unit of the US 3rd Marine Tank Battalion. With the FAC adjusting fire, the Patton fired three 90 mm rounds;[13] obtaining a hit with the third round. The tank crew abandoned their vehicle. Shortly afterward, some returning F-4 Phantom jet fighter bombers, with ordnance to expend, observed the PT-76 and bombed the vehicle into scrap metal. As expected, the F-4's claimed the kill.[13]

Battle of Ben HetEdit
Destroyed PT76 tank at Ben Het

One of ten PT-76s from the NVA 202nd Armored Regiment, destroyed by US M48 Pattons, from the 1/69th Armored battalion, during the battle of Ben Het, March 3, 1969, Vietnam.[14]

Of the US Army's three armor (tank) battalions in Vietnam, only the 1/69th engaged in a tank to tank duel. On March 3, 1969, the Special Forces camp at Ben Het was attacked by the NVA 202nd Armored Regiment. The 202nd was tasked with the mission of destroying the camp's 175 mm self-propelled guns.[13][15] One of the PT-76s had detonated a land mine, which not only alerted the camp, but also lit up the other PT-76s attacking the firebase. Flares had been sent up, thus exposing adversary tanks, but sighting in on muzzle flashes, one PT-76 scored a direct hit on the turret of a M48, killing two Patton crewmen and wounding two more. A second Patton, using the same technique, destroyed a PT-76 with their second shot. At daybreak, the battlefield revealed the wreckage of two PT-76s and one BTR-50 armored personnel carrier.[13]

First combat use of the TOW MissileEdit
PT-76 monument

A North Vietnamese PT-76 as a monument to the North Vietnamese victory in the Battle of Lang Vei.

On May 9, 1972, the PT-76 unwillingly participated in changing the story of armored warfare.[14] On April 24, 1972, a US special experimental UH-1B helicopter team, consisting of two helicopters mounting the new XM26 TOW anti-tank missile (Tube Launched, Optically Tracked, Wire guided), accompanied by technicians from Bell Helicopters and the Hughes Aircraft Corporation arrived in country. The team, labeled the 1st Combat Aerial TOW Team deployed to the Central Highlands in Vietnam and commenced gunnery training. From May 2, the team made daily flights in search of enemy armor. On May 9, NVA armored units attacked the Ranger camp at Ben Het; the TOW team destroyed 3 PT-76s and broke up the attack.[14]

On May 26, the North Vietnamese Army made another attempt to retake the city of Kontum. TOW aircraft were brought in at first light and found NVA tanks moving almost at will through portions of the city. Conventional air strikes would prove risky to friendly forces, but the TOW proved to be ideal for picking off enemy tanks.[14] At the end of the first day, the two TOW helicopters had destroyed 9 tanks and damaged one more. Five of the destroyed tanks had been T-54/55s and the remaining four destroyed and one damaged were PT-76s. By the end of the month, TOW missiles launched from helicopters had 47 confirmed kills, of which 24 were tanks.[13]

Other Combat ServiceEdit

North Vietnamese PT-76s were involved in the only tank-against-tank battle of the war prior to the US withdrawal. In a night assault on a US Special Forces camp, in which the Americans had been warned, the garrison, which had been reinforced with a platoon of M48A3 main battle tanks from the 1st Battalion 69th Armored battalion. The garrison also included a CIDG unit. The engagement took place on March 3, 1969 at Ben Het in Kontum Province near the Laotian border. The North Vietnamese fired 639 artillery and mortar rounds into the camp, before a battalion from the 66th NVA Regiment supported by ten PT-76s and a few APCs attacked the west hill held by a CIDG company supported by the platoon of M48s. The PT-76s drove into a minefield in which two were destroyed. Two more PT-76s and one APC were destroyed by the M48As. Six PT-76s were destroyed by artillery fire and airstrikes. US casualties consisted of one M48 being lightly damaged.[1].[16][17]

The PT-76 also saw action with Indian forces in the Indo-Pakistani War of 1965 and 1971. Despite the PT-76 being obsolete by 1971, the superior tactics and overwhelming numbers of the Indian Army enabled it to play a vital role in defeating the Pakistani Army. In the Eastern theater the high numbers of PT-76s proved superior to the Pakistani World War II era M24 Chaffee light tanks. It was a different story in the western theater where they proved incapable of facing Pakistani M48 Patton and Type 59 main battle tanks especially at the crucial Battle of Chhamb.

The PT-76 also saw service in the Six Day War (1967) during which the Israeli army destroyed or captured about 200 Egyptian T-54, T-55 and PT-76 tanks. During the Yom Kippur War in 1973 PT-76s were used during the crossing of the Great Bitter Lake by the Egyptian 135th Marines Brigade.[8][18]

It also saw service in the Angolan Civil War (1975–2002).

During the Yugoslav wars, the PT-76 saw service with the Yugoslav Peoples Army and later the army of the Krajina Serbs in a few battles during the Ten-Day War in Slovenia (1991) and Croatian War of Independence (1991–1995).

The Indonesian Navy used its PT-76Bs on the Indonesian island of Ambon during civil unrest from 2000 onwards.

List of conflictsEdit

VariantsEdit

Soviet UnionEdit

PT-76 B

PT-76B amphibious light tank.

BTR-50-latrun-1-2

Ex-Syrian or ex-Egyptian BTR-50PK APC in Yad la-Shiryon Museum, Israel. 2005.

ASU-85 6 Dywizji Powietrznodesantowej

ASU-85 airborne self-propelled gun.

ZSU-23-4 Shilka, Togliatti, Russia-2

ZSU-23-4 self-propelled antiaircraft gun. It's based on the GM-575 chassis.

ZRK KUB 2007 G1

2P25 launch vehicle of the 2K12 Kub SAM system. It's based on the GM-578 chassis.

  • PT-76 Model 1 (Ob'yekt 740,[8] 1951) - An original PT-76 armed with the D-56T 76.2 mm rifled tank gun (no bore evaluator, long multi-slotted muzzle brake and fume extractor). It was produced in small numbers between 1953 and 1954.[3][19]
    • PT-76 Model 2 (1954) - PT-76 armed with the D-56TM 76.2 mm rifled tank gun (double-baffle muzzle brake, bore evaluator, fume extractor and single-axis stabilization). It also has a spotlight fitted to a bracket on the right-hand edge of the turret roof. It first appeared in 1954 and was produced until 1963.[19]
      • PT-76B (PT-76 Model 4, Ob'yekt 740B, 1958) - PT-76 armed with the D-56TS or the D-56B 76.2 mm rifled tank gun (double-baffle muzzle brake, cartridge ejector, fume extractor and STP-2P 'Zarya' 2-axis stabilization system), the PKT 7.62 mm coaxial general purpose machine gun instead of the SGMT 7.62 mm coaxial medium machine gun, a TDA thermo smoke generating system, a new R-113 radio instead of the old 10-RT-26E set (It was later replaced by the R-123), the PAZ (protivo-atomnaya zashchita) NBC protection system, an automatic fire extinguishing system, improved TShK-2-66 sight, a filtration-ventilation system, improved observation devices, improved electric equipment, a new V-6B 6-cylinder 4-stroke in line water cooled diesel engine developing 263 hp (196 kW) at 1800 rpm and additional internal fuel tanks for which the shape of the armour had to be slightly changed. These additional internal fuel tanks increased the fuel capacity from 250 l to 400 l. The new engine is the same as that used in one bank of that fitted to the T-54. With the new engine and additional fuel tanks, the range of the vehicle has been increased to 480 km on the road, (590 km with external fuel tanks) and 120 km on the water. The 76.2 mm D-56TS or D-56B rifled tank gun can fire a new undercaliber AP projectile piercing up to 75 mm at 60° from 2,000 meters. One such round has been added to a PT-76B typical ammunition load and so it can now carry 41 rounds. The height of the hull on this variant has also been increased. It was produced between 1958 - 1969.[1][2][6][8][8][9][19]
        • PT-71 (Not to be confused with the Israeli PT-71) - is a PT-76B fitted with 9M14 "Malyutka" (NATO code: AT-3 Sagger) anti-tank guided missile pack mounted on the rear of the turret.[19]
  • PT-76A - A designator for different PT-76 and PT-76B models armed with the DShK 1938/46 12.7 mm antiaircraft heavy machine gun on a rotateable mount on top of the turret.[19]
  • PT-76 armed with a 57 mm autocannon.[9]
  • PT-76K - Command version with an additional antenna on the right hand side of the turret and a generator at the rear of the deck.[19]
  • PT-76M (Ob'yekt 740M) - PT-76 with improved amphibious features thanks to slightly larger displacement. This variant was developed for the Russian Naval Marines but was not adopted because it did not have improved combat features. Instead the Marines adopted the PT-76B (with a snorkel).[1][19]
  • PT-85 (Ob'yekt 906) (Not to be confused with PT-85 with a cast turret or North Korean Type 82) - PT-76 armed with 85 mm rifled tank gun.[19]
  • PT-90 (Ob'yekt 906) - PT-76 armed with 90 mm rifled tank gun.[19]
  • PT-85 (Not to be confused with Ob'yekt 906 or North Korean Type 82) - A PT-76 with a cast turret and a 85 mm gun. It was used during the Invasion of Czechoslovakia.[19]
  • Objekt 280 - PT-76 fitted with a 16x130mm multi barrel rocket launcher.[19]
  • PT-76RKh - PT-76 converted to a light amphibious NBC reconnaissance tank. It has a dome cupola and a flag marker at the rear.[19]
  • BTR-50 - PT-76 converted into an amphibious tracked APC.[2].
  • Ob'yekt 914 - experimental IFV. This vehicle was developed in the early 1960s by a design team led by I. V. Gavalov at the Volgograd Tractor Works (VTZ) and the prototype was ready for trials in 1964. The Ob'yekt 914 was armed with two 7.62 mm PKT general purpose machine guns mounted in the hull on either side of the driver. It had a crew of two and could transport up to eight fully equipped soldiers (two of whom operated the PKTs). Its combat weight was 14.4 tons. After a series of trials in 1964, the Ob'yekt 765 was selected to become the BMP-1 due mostly to the rear engine design which obliged the infantry to mount and dismount through the single door in the rear of the right hand side of the vehicle and roof hatches. It was also felt that the Ob'yekt 765 had a better overall layout.
  • MTP-1 A PT-76 converted into a technical support vehicle.[4]
  • UR-67 (ustanovka razminirovaniya) - Mine-clearing vehicle equipped with a UR-67 rocket launcher system which has three launchers firing UZP-67 or UZR-3 tubes filled with explosives. The UZP-67 or UZR-3 tubes are carried in a fabric tube container carried inside the hull of the vehicle. The mine clearing procedure is composed of driving the vehicle to the edge of the minefield and aligning it before the rockets are fired from its elevated launcher at the rear of the vehicle. As the rocket travels it tows the line charge, (which is secured to the launcher vehicle), across the minefield. The line charge is then positioned by the vehicle crew using the securing line and detonated to clear any mines in its vicinity. The cleared lane is usually 60 m to 150 m long and 2 m to 5 m wide. The vehicle has a crew of three. Some of the vehicles were based on the BTR-50PK APC while some were based on the PT-76. It was known in the west as MTK and MTK-1. Only a small number remains in service, most having been replaced by the UR-77.[4][19]
  • ASU-85 - PT-76 converted into an 85 mm airborne assault gun. [3].
  • FROG-2 "Mars" tactical missile launch vehicle.[1][8][20]
  • FROG-5 "Luna" tactical missile launch vehicle.[1][20]
  • GM-568 - Chassis used for the 1S91 guidance vehicle of 2K12 Kub surface-to-air missile system. It uses some elements from the PT-76 including the drive train and wheels. It's nearly identical to the GM-578 chassis.[21]
  • GM-575 - Chassis used for the ZSU-23-4 self-propelled anti-aircraft gun. It uses a number of components from PT-76.
  • GM-578 - Chassis used for the 2P25 launch vehicle 2K12 Kub surface-to-air missile system. It uses some elements from the PT-76 including the drive train and wheels. It's nearly identical to the GM-568 chassis.[21]

People's Republic of ChinaEdit

  • Type 60 - The Chinese obtained a few PT-76s in the mid 1950s. In October 1958, the People's Liberation Army (PLA), decided to develop an indigenous amphibious tank based on the PT-76. The development program was carried out by 201 Institute and 615 Factory. A prototype known as the WZ221 was built and tested in 1959, but the design suffered from a number of problems including engine overheating. The PLA wasn't satisfied with the performance of the vehicle, which led to the development of a new vehicle based on the Type 60, Type 63 amphibious light tank.

CzechoslovakiaEdit

OT-62-Topas-latrun-2

OT-62 TOPAS APC in Yad la-Shiryon Museum, Israel. 2005. Note the second bay and the side hatch.

  • OT-62 TOPAS (OT-62 stands for Obrněný Transportér vzor 62 - "Armored Personnel Carrier model 62") ("TOPAS" stands for Transportér Obrněný PÁSový - "Tracked Armored Personnel Carrier") - A series of BTR-50 variants developed jointly by Poland and Czechoslovakia. They are similar to the BTR-50PK but have hatches in the hull sides, a more powerful PV-6 engine of 300 hp (224 kW) and two projecting bays like the BTR-50PU.[4].

East GermanyEdit

  • K1 - Command tank based on PT-76 Model 2s and PT-76Bs. It is equipped with an extra R-112 radio.[19]

IndonesiaEdit

  • PT-76B fitted with Cockerill 76,2 mm smooth bore tank gun (with multi-slot muzzle-brake) and larger gunners sight.[19]

IsraelEdit

  • PT-71 (Not to be confused with the Soviet PT-71) - Is a PT-76 upgrade built by Nimda Group Ltd., which includes a 90 mm Cockerill tank gun, a new machine gun, a new fire control system, a laser range finder, night vision devices and a 300 hp (224 kW) diesel engine. The only known customers were the Israeli and Indonesian armies. [5].[19]

North KoreaEdit

  • PT-85 (Type 82) (Not to be confused with Ob'yekt 906 or PT-85 with a cast turret) - North Korea developed their own vehicle based partly on the PT-76.

PolandEdit

  • PT-76 Model 2 with additional 12.7 mm DShK 1938/46 antiaircraft heavy machine gun on a rotatable mount and separate hatches for the commander and loader.
  • PT-76 Model 2 with additional periscopes fitted on the right of the turret roof.[19]
  • PT-76 Model 2 without the muzzle brake.[19]
  • PT-76B with additional 12.7 mm DShK 1938/46 antiaircraft heavy machine gun on a rotatable mount and separate hatches for commander and loader.[19]
  • OT-62 TOPAS (OT-62 stands for Obrněný Transportér vzor 62 - "Armoured Personnel Carrier model 62") ("TOPAS" stands for Transportér Obrněný PÁSový - "Tracked Armoured Personnel Carrier") - Series of BTR-50 variants developed jointly by Poland and Czechoslovakia. They are similar to the BTR-50PK but have hatches in the hull sides, a more powerful PV-6 engine with 300 hp (224 kW) and two projecting bays like the BTR-50PU.[6].
  • WPT-76 - FROG launch vehicle converted to an Armored Recovery Vehicle (ARV).[19]

RussiaEdit

  • PT-76B fitted with a new B6M diesel engine developing 300 hp (224 kW) which increased the maximum road speed from 44 km/h to 45 km/h and the maximum swimming speed from 10,2 km/h to 11,2 km/h. This increased the power to weight ratio from 17.1 hp/tonne (12.3 kW/tonne) to 19.5 hp/tonne (14.5 kW/tonne).[10]
  • PT-76E - This is the most recent PT-76 modernization program. It increases the vehicle's battle efficiency by including a radical growth in firepower, which required a new turret and other weapons. This variant is armed with a 57 mm autocannon (which is a modification of the 57 mm L/76.6 S-60 AA gun. It was developed by CB Burevestnik (Nizhniy Novgorod). Its armor-piercing tracer rounds fired from 1,120 m can penetrate 100 mm of steel armor. The new weapon can destroy most modern APCs and IFVs. It can also engage aerial targets out to 6 km. The autocannon uses two types of ammunition, splinter-tracer and armor-piercing-tracer. However, it is possible to fire a special zenith shell. The gun can fire single shots, short bursts (2 to 5 rounds), or long bursts (up to 20 rounds). It can also fire continuously up to 120 rounds per minute. This system functions by using the energy generated by each round, not by using an external power source. Firepower is improved 5.5 times in the PT-76E over the PT-76B.

The PT-76E is fitted with a more powerful UTD-20 6-cylinder 4-stroke V-shaped airless-injection water cooled multifuel 15.8 litre diesel engine. It develops 300 hp (224 kW) at 2,600 rpm and is taken from the BMP-1 as is the transmission. The power to weight ratio has been improved to 20 horsepower (15 kW) per ton. This also increases the maximum road speed from 44 km/h to 60 km/h, with an average cross country speed from 32 km/h to 42 km/h. The vehicle has new tracks. Driver fatigue has been reduced. The vehicle's survivability on the battlefield is improved with the introduction of a new fast-acting firefighting system. The vehicle also has improvements in fire control and optical equipment. This modernization program increases the PT-76's performance by 2.7 times, which is still comparatively low. The vehicle was accepted by the Russian marines in 2006 and about 40 or 50 vehicles were ordered.[22]

United States of AmericaEdit

  • The PT-76 was used by the US Army for OpFor training. They were modified in a number of ways including the replacement of the engine with a caterpillar diesel engine, changing the turret hatch to a rear hinged arrangement and the fitting of US radios and antennae mounts. Due to the new engines different exhaust arrangements, the exhausts were rerouted to use the water-jet ports rather than the original engine exhaust.[19]

VietnamEdit

  • PT-76 fitted with an antiaircraft machine gun on top of the turret.

OperatorsEdit

  •  Afghanistan - [8][19] 50 ordered in 1958 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1959 and 1961.[23] 60 in service as of 1996.[24]
  •  Albania - 150
  •  Angola - [8] 68 ordered in 1975 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1975 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service).[23] 12 were in service as of 1996 and are currently in service.[24][25]
  •  Benin - [19] 20 ordered in 1981 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1982 (the vehicles were second hand).[23] 20 in service as of 1996.[24]
  •  Cambodia - [19] 10 ordered in 1983 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1983 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service). 10 ordered in 1988 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1989 as aid (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service).[23]
  •  Republic of the Congo - 3 ordered in 1971 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1972 (the vehicles were second hand).[23]
  •  Cuba - [8][19] 60 ordered in 1970 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1971 and 1973 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service).[7][23] 50 in service with the marines as of 1996.[24]
  •  Egypt - [8][24] 50 ordered in 1965 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1966. 200 ordered in 1970 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1970 and 1972 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service).[23]
  •  Guinea - [8][19] 20 ordered in 1977 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1977 (the vehicles were second hand).[23] 18 in service as of 1996.[24]
  •  Guinea-Bissau - 20 ordered in 1977 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1978 (the vehicles were second hand).[23]
  •  Hungary - [8][19][24] 100 ordered in 1957 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1959 and 1960.[23]
  •  Indonesia - [8][19] Used by the Marine Corps. 50 PT-76Bs ordered in 1962 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1964.[23] 60 PT-76Bs were in service as of 1996.[24] At the peak there were 170 PT-76Bs in service. Currently 30 PT-76Bs are in service.[26]
  •  Israel - [8][19] Captured a number of Syrian and/or Egyptian PT-76s during the Six Day War (1967).[8][24]
  • Template:LAO - [8][19] 30 were in service as of 1996.[24] Currently 25 are in service.
  • Template:MDG - [19][24] 12 ordered in 1983 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1983 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service).[23] Currently 32 are in service.
  •  Mali - One battalion armed with PT-76s and Type 62s.
  •  Mozambique - [8][24] 16
  •  Nicaragua - [19] 22 ordered in 1983 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1984 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service).[23] Currently 10 are in service.
  •  North Korea - [8][19] 100 ordered in 1965 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1966 and 1967.[23] 100 in service as of 1985, 600 as of 1990, 550 as of 1995, 300 as of 1996, 550 as of 2000, 400 as of 2002 and 560 as of 2005.[24][27] North Korea also operates a number of North Korean PT-85 amphibious light tanks.[27]
  •  Pakistan - [8] 32 ordered in 1968 from Indonesia and delivered between 1969 and 1970 (the vehicles were second hand).[23]
  •  Republic of China - 3
  •  Russia - 200 in service as of 1995, 1,100 as of 1996, 150 as of 2000, 2003, 2005 and 2008. As of now there are 79 PT-76s in service, 78 of which are currently used by the marines, 1 is in a tank repair base.[10][24][28]
  •  Syria - [8] 80 ordered in 1971 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1972 and 1973 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service).[23] 100 in service as of 1996.[24]
  •  Uganda - [8][19][24] 50 ordered in 1973 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1974 and 1975 (the vehicles were possibly previously in Soviet service).[23] Currently 20 are in service.
  • Template:VIE - [8][19] 500 were in service as of 1996.[24] Currently 300 are in service. Vietnam also operates a number of North Korean PT-85s.
  •  Zambia - [19][24] 50 ordered in 1983 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1984 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service).[23] Currently 30 are in service.

Former OperatorsEdit

Soviet PT-76 model2 2

A PT-76 at the United States Army Ordnance Museum (Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD) on June 12, 2007.

Soviet PT-76 model2 1

Head-on view of a PT-76 at the United States Army Ordnance Museum (Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD) on June 12, 2007.

  •  Belarus - 8 in service as of 1995 and none as 2000.[29]
  •  Bulgaria - [8][24] 250 ordered in 1959 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1960 and 1964.[23] Withdrawn from service.[30]
  • Template:CRO - [19] 1 in service as of 1998 an 9 as of 2003.[31] All were captured from JNA. Scrapped.
  •  Finland - [8] 15 ordered in 1960 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1961.[23]
  •  East Germany - [8][24] 170 ordered in 1956 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1957 and 1959.[23] PT-76 Model 2 and PT-76B, passed on to the unified German state.[19]
  •  West Germany/ Germany - PT-76 Model 2 and PT-76B, taken from the GDR's army. All were scrapped or sold to other countries.
  •  India - [8] 178 ordered in 1962 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1964 and 1965.[23] 100 in service as of 1990 and 1995, 90 in service as of 1996, around 90 as of 2000, 2002 and 2005 and around 100 as of 2008.[24][32] Retired as of 2009.[12]
  •  Iraq - [8][19][24] 45 ordered in 1967 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1968 and 1970 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). 200 ordered in 1983 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1984 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service).[23] 100 in service as of 1990, 1995, 2000 and 2002.[33] All destroyed or scrapped.
  •  People's Republic of China - Designed a copy of the PT-76, known as the Type 60 but it proved to be unsatisfactory and was replaced by a Chinese design, the Type 63.
  •  Poland - 300 ordered in 1955 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1957 and 1958.[23] 30 in service as of 1996.[24] Poland operated both PT-76 Model 2 and PT-76B. They served with the reconnaissance subunits of tank divisions and mechanized divisions of Coastal Defense units including the 7th Lusatian Landing Division. Poland also used the FROG-5 "Luna" tactical missile launch vehicle. Some of them were converted into WPT-76 ARVs. All PT-76s and vehicles based on it were withdrawn from service.
  •  Soviet Union - About 12,000 produced (about 10,000 for the Soviet Army and about 2,000 for export).[1] 1,000 in service as of 1990.[28] About 1,113 were in Soviet Union during the breakup of the USSR. They were passed on to successor states.
  •  Ukraine - 50[34] were originally inherited from the former Soviet Union. 5 in service as of 1995 and none as of 2000.[35]
  • United States - [19] The US Army used a number of PT-76s in the OPFOR role for training.[19]
  •  North Vietnam - 150 ordered in 1964 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1959 and 1960 (aid, the vehicles were possibly previously in Soviet service). 100 ordered in 1971 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1971 and 1972 (aid, the vehicles were possibly previously in Soviet service).[23] Passed on to the unified Vietnam state.
  •  Yugoslavia - [8][19][24] 100 ordered in 1962 from the Soviet Union and delivered 1963.[36]

Evaluation-only operatorsEdit

  •  Czechoslovakia - [8] Bought 1 and evaluated it, but didn't accept it.[37]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 "Enemy Forces"
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 "Modern Tanks"
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 "Global Security"
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 "Pancerni.net"
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 "Gary's Combat Vehicle Reference Guide"
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 "panzersgt"[dead link]
  7. 7.0 7.1 "Cuban Tanks"
  8. 8.00 8.01 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 8.11 8.12 8.13 8.14 8.15 8.16 8.17 8.18 8.19 8.20 8.21 8.22 8.23 8.24 8.25 8.26 8.27 8.28 8.29 "softland" (in Polish)
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 "Military Factory"
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 "Warfare.ru"
  11. FROG-5 pictures
  12. 12.0 12.1 Bharat Rakshak :: Land Forces Site - PT-76
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 13.6 Dunstan
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 Starry
  15. Starry, p. 153
  16. "Czołgi Świata" (World's Tanks or Tanks Of The World) magazine issue 1
  17. Vietnam War Battle of Ben Het
  18. "Czołgi Świata" (World's Tanks or Tanks Of The World) magazine issue 25
  19. 19.00 19.01 19.02 19.03 19.04 19.05 19.06 19.07 19.08 19.09 19.10 19.11 19.12 19.13 19.14 19.15 19.16 19.17 19.18 19.19 19.20 19.21 19.22 19.23 19.24 19.25 19.26 19.27 19.28 19.29 19.30 19.31 19.32 19.33 19.34 19.35 19.36 19.37 19.38 19.39 19.40 19.41 "JED The Military Equipment Directory"
  20. 20.0 20.1 http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/missile/row/frog-2.htm
  21. 21.0 21.1 Militarium Kub
  22. Voyenny Parad, No 3, 2005, pp. 72-74
  23. 23.00 23.01 23.02 23.03 23.04 23.05 23.06 23.07 23.08 23.09 23.10 23.11 23.12 23.13 23.14 23.15 23.16 23.17 23.18 23.19 23.20 23.21 23.22 23.23 23.24 SIPRI Arms Transfers Database
  24. 24.00 24.01 24.02 24.03 24.04 24.05 24.06 24.07 24.08 24.09 24.10 24.11 24.12 24.13 24.14 24.15 24.16 24.17 24.18 24.19 24.20 24.21 24.22 24.23 "Pancerni 2"
  25. Angolan army armyrecognition.com
  26. Indonisian army armyrecognition
  27. 27.0 27.1 Equipment Holdings - Korean People's Army
  28. 28.0 28.1 Soviet/Russian Army equipment
  29. Belarus Army Equipment
  30. Military equipment of Bulgaria, soldiering.ru
  31. Croatian Armor
  32. India Army Equipment
  33. Iraqi Ground Forces Equipment
  34. Ukrainian army armyrecognition.com
  35. Ground Forces Equipment - Ukraine
  36. Trade Register 1950 to 2007
  37. Věřte Nevěřte historii Armády České republiky

ReferencesEdit

  • Dunstan, Simon. "Vietnam Tracks-Armor In Battle." 1982 edition; Osprey Publishing. ISBN 0-89141-171-2.
  • Starry, Donn A. General. "Mounted Combat In Vietnam." Vietnam Studies; Department of the Army. First Printed 1978-CMH 90-17.
  • Stockwell, David B. "Tanks In The Wire." Account of the Battle of the US Special Forces camp at Lang Vei in 1968. (1990); ISBN 0-5151-0333-0.

External linksEdit


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